Last edited by Vor
Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of geology of Long Island, New York found in the catalog.

geology of Long Island, New York

Fuller, Myron L.

geology of Long Island, New York

by Fuller, Myron L.

  • 215 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by Govt. print. off. in Washington .
Written in English

    Places:
  • New York (State),
  • Long Island.
    • Subjects:
    • Geology -- New York (State) -- Long Island.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby Myron L. Fuller.
      SeriesUnited States. Geological survey. Professional paper 82
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQE75 .P9 no. 82
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxvi, 231 p.
      Number of Pages231
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL251579M
      LC Control Numbergs 14000294
      OCLC/WorldCa4911625

      Long Island Geologists. Long Island Geologists is a program of the Department of Geosciences at Stony Brook University. Its activities include field trips and an annual conference on the "Geology of Long Island and Metropolitan New York". Home New York State Maps Collection Geologic Map of Long Island, New York IM or document To embed this object, paste this HTML in website. Geologic Map of Long Island, New York. View Description. Download: small (x max) medium (x max) Large. Extra Large. large (> x) Full Resolution. Long Island Books and Documents.

      22 x 50 inches. Fine, full original wash color; folds as issued, lightly toned in few areas, fine overall. A large, very well-detailed map of Long Island that highlights the area's geological and topographic features and indicates in yellow coloring the beach areas existing at the time. The Connecticut shoreline and Manhattan and its surroundings are also included. Geology-- New York (State)-- Long Island (N.Y.) Geology-- New York Metropolitan Area Staten Island (New York, N.Y.) -- Maps, Topographic Genres Maps Notes Content: Grid of mile squares. Content: Includes inset "Map of New-York Island." Content: Mercator Society Fund.

      Long Island Mineral and Geology Society, Mattituck, NY. likes. The Long Island Mineral and Geology Society was formed in to serve the residents on the east end of Long Island. Figure 8 is block diagram that shows the topography and geology of western Long Island (including Brooklyn and Queens) in three dimensions. Thumbnail of Figure 8. this geologic agent may create other evidence that we might be still able to see today in the New York City region. Give examples of .


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Geology of Long Island, New York by Fuller, Myron L. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Buy The Geology of Long Island: From the Annals of the New York Academy geology of Long Island Sciences, Vol. III, Nos. 11 (Classic Reprint) on Author: Frederick James Hamilton Merrill. Long Island Books and Documents Collection; Add or remove collections The Geology of Long Island, New York.

Page 1: Save page Previous: 1 of Next: View Description. Page Flip View: Download: small (x max) medium (x max) Large. Extra Large. large (> x). This book is a great introduction to the world of geology in New York, geology of Long Island it covers the roads many of us travel daily.

It does help to have some prior knowledge of eras, periods, and epochs however these are all outlined before you get to the preface of the book, so study these before diving in to read about your part of the state/5(34).

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Fuller, Myron L. Geology of Long Island, New York (OCoLC) Microfilm version: Fuller, Myron L. Geology of Long Island, New York. Long Island Geologists is a program of the Department of Geosciences at Stony Brook University.

Each year the activities include one or two field trips and on a Saturday in April a conference on the "Geology of Long Island and Metropolitan New York." Teachers and professional geologists can receive in-service credit for participating in these events. The East River, highlighted in red here, separates Long Island from Manhattan Island and from the mainland.

Long Island, as part of the Outer Lands region, is formed largely of four spines of glacial moraine, with a large, sandy outwash plain towards its barrier islands and the Atlantic Ocean. The upper portion of Long Island’s geological layers were formed between the Upper Cretaceous Period (72 to million years ago) and Pleistocene Epoch to million years ago), and consists of mostly sedimentary elements: gravels, sand, and clay (see Bedrock Geology map here, provided by RegentsEarth), which were all deposited by glaciers (M and S 5).

The present landforms of Long Island are the result of many geologic processes, some of which began many millions of years ago and some of which began only recently. Most of the major features of the present-day topography, however, are related to the last. CHAPTER 3 Geology of New York State NYSDOT Geotechnical Page J Design Manual Ablation – the decrease in size and extent of a glacier by melting and evaporation.

Alluvium - clay, silt, sand, gravel, or other rock material transported by flowing water and deposited in riverbeds, estuaries, and floodplains, on lakes, shores, and in fans at the base of. Long Island is part of the Outer Lands Region; it is primarily formed by four spines of glacial moraine— a mass of rocks and sediment carried down and deposited by a glacier, typically as ridges at its edges or extremity.

The morainesconsist of gravel and loose rock left behind by the Wisconsin glaciation s years ago (19, BC). Geology and engineering geology of the New York metropolitan area.

28th International Geological Congress Field Trip Guidebook T, Washington: AGU, Baskerville, C.A. Bedrock and engineering geologic maps of New York County and parts of Kings and Queens Counties, New York, and parts of Bergen and Hudson Counties, New Jersey.

The mission of the Geology Department and New York State Geological Survey (NYSGS) is to conduct geologic research, evaluate mineral resources and geologic hazards of the State of New York, and make the data and advice derived from that research available to State agencies, the educational community, and the public for the health, safety, and economic welfare of the citizens of.

Similar Items. Geology of the "foot" clay and Gardiners clay in southern Nassau and southwestern Suffolk counties, Long Island, New York / by: Doriski, Thomas P., et al.

Published: () Hydrogeology of northwestern Nassau and northeastern Queens Counties, Long Island, New York / by: Swarzenski, W. Published: (). Sanders, J. E., and Merguerian, Charles, b, The glacial geology of New York City and vicinity, p.

in A. Benimoff, ed., The Geology of Staten Island, New York, Field guide and proceedings, The Geological Association of New Jersey, XI Annual Meeting, p.

John E. Sanders* and Charles Merguerian Department of Geology. Coordinates. Long Island (locally: / l ɔː ŋ ˈ ɡ aɪ ˌ l ə n d /) is a densely populated island in the southeast part of the U.S. state of New York, in the northeastern United New York Harbor it is approximately miles ( km) from Manhattan Island and extends eastward over miles ( km) into the Atlantic island comprises four counties; Kings and Queens.

New York Geology Reading List. Graff, M. and Thomas Hanley. Rock Trails in Central Park. New York: The Greensward Foundation, McCully, Betsy. City at the Water’s Edge: A Natural History of New York (Rivergate/Rutgers University Press, ) Roberts, David C. Geology of Eastern North America. Peterson Field Guides.

AEG New York - Philadelphia Chapter - Home. Report describing the geology of Long Island based on surveys and research conductedwith a particular emphasis on glacial deposits and formations from the Pleistocene epoch. It includes a broad discussion, with tabular summaries. Race Rock Light is a lighthouse on Race Rock Reef, a dangerous set of rocks on Long Island Sound southwest of Fishers Island, New York and the site of many shipwrecks.

It is currently owned and maintained by the New London Maritime Society as part of the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Act program. Race Rock Light was built –78 and designed by Francis Hopkinson Smith ( Unconsolidated strata of clay, silt, sand, and gravel of Late Cretaceous and pre-Wisconsin Pleistocene ages lie between crystalline basement rocks (bedrock) of Precambrian () age and unconsolidated deposits of late Pleistocene (Wisconsin) and Holocene ages in Queens County, Lond Island, N.Y.

Data collected during a recent study of the hydrogeology of the county and updated records of earlier. According to the geologic record, during which geologic time period were the sands and clays underlying Long Island and Staten Island deposited?

Page e Review Book Company Geologic History of New York State.Content: GEOLOGY OF THE LONG ISLAND PLATFORM Les Sirkin, Department of Earth science, Adelphi University, Garden City, New York The strata of the Long Island Platform include Upper Cretaceous marine sediments and Pleistocene glacial and nonGlacial basement rock where sampled is similar to the early Paleozoic gneisses of southern New York and New England.Genre/Form: Maps: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Suter, Russell, Mapping of geologic formations and aquifers of Long Island, New York.